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"Their blood is Eastern" : Shahin Makaryus and fin de siecle Arab pride in the Jewish "race"

By: Gribetz, Jonathan Marc, 1980-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSubject(s): Arabic newspapers -- Palestine -- History -- 20th century | Jewish-Arab relations -- History -- 1917-1948 -- Public opinion | Jewish-Arab relations -- Public opinion | Jewish-Arab relations -- 20th century In: Middle Eastern studies Vol. 49, no. 2 (March 2013), pp. 143-161Abstract: "This article studies the origins and functions of a belief in Jewish race in the Arab fin de siècle through a case study of the writings of Shahin Makaryus and al-Muqtataf, the influential journal he co-edited. The article begins by examining the racial definition of the Jews proffered by Makaryus and al-Muqtataf. It situates this view, first, within the then-recent controversy surrounding Darwinism and the problem of secularism within the Arab renaissance of the fin de siècle and, second, within the contemporary Egyptian discourse about race concerning Egypt's rule over the Sudan. It then studies the presumed implications of this categorization of the Jews for their supposed racial relatives, the Arabs. It argues that it was precisely the imagined racial link between Jews and Arabs that made race an attractive category for understanding the Jews in the minds of certain Nahda thinkers. Next, it examines Makaryus's approach to Jewish nationalism and Zionism and contends that his appare ...
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"This article studies the origins and functions of a belief in Jewish race in the Arab fin de siècle through a case study of the writings of Shahin Makaryus and al-Muqtataf, the influential journal he co-edited. The article begins by examining the racial definition of the Jews proffered by Makaryus and al-Muqtataf. It situates this view, first, within the then-recent controversy surrounding Darwinism and the problem of secularism within the Arab renaissance of the fin de siècle and, second, within the contemporary Egyptian discourse about race concerning Egypt's rule over the Sudan. It then studies the presumed implications of this categorization of the Jews for their supposed racial relatives, the Arabs. It argues that it was precisely the imagined racial link between Jews and Arabs that made race an attractive category for understanding the Jews in the minds of certain Nahda thinkers. Next, it examines Makaryus's approach to Jewish nationalism and Zionism and contends that his appare ...

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